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Disorders of the Lower Extremity

Physician's Assistants' Course notes on anatomy of the pelvis, coccyx fractures; the most serious complication of pelvic fractures; femoral neck fractures; femoral shaft fracture; patella (kneecap) fractures; ligamentous knee injuries; meniscal injuries; dislocated patella; quadriceps or patella tendon rupture; chondromalacia patellae; fibula and tibia fractures; Achilles tendon rupture; gastrocnemius rupture; shin splints; Osgood-Schlatter disease; Ottawa Ankle Rules for ankle injuries; lateral ankle ligament injuries; ankle fractures; indications for orthopedic consultation following ankle injuries; foot anatomy & function; avascular necrosis in the foot; turf toe; Plantar fasciitis; Morton neuroma; Metatarsal stress fractures; calcaneal fractures; injures to the Lisfranc joint; forefoot fractures; nondisplaced metatarsal shaft fractures; Jones fractures; nondisplaced phalangeal fractures; compartment syndrome; compartment of the leg most at risk for compartment syndrome; presentation of compartment syndrome; signs of anterior compartment syndrome; treatment of compartment syndrome; CT vs MRI for pelvic trauma; imaging technique for the “occult” hip fracture; imaging technique of choice for soft tissue injuries

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Live Webcast Birmingham Hip Resurfacing Procedure

On April 17, 2007, 5pm EDT, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center surgeons will demonstrate a Birmingham Hip™ Resurfacing procedure on www.OR-Live.com. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in May 2006, the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing System is designed to remove less of the patient’s bone than traditional hip replacement surgery. “This is a breakthrough in total hip surgery that allows hip replacements to be performed in young and active patients and allows them to participate in sports activities without the limitations imposed on standard total joint patients,” said Riyaz Jinnah, M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery.

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Minimally Invasive Computer Assisted Total Knee Replacement

A minimally invasive computer assisted, total knee replacement surgery will be performed live over the Internet from Tampa General Hospital on April 18, 2007 at 4 p.m. ET. The procedure involves resurfacing the ends of the bones by making a small incision through which physicians place an implant that prevents bones from rubbing against each other. Because the minimally invasive procedure cuts less or no muscle, it gives the patient the potential for the fastest possible recovery.

Kenneth Gustke, M.D., Florida Orthopaedic Institute, founding member of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons, will perform the procedure that will be narrated by Steven Lyons, M.D., a surgeon at the Florida Orthopaedic Institute.

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Editors

  • Chris Oliver