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My Broken Leg

9 out of 10 stars (2 votes)

Patient mutual support group. Has over 600 "diaries" describing patients' experiences with lower limb fractures. Also has a forum for patients to discuss issues related to their injury and offer mutual support.

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Bone Fixator

9 out of 10 stars (1 vote)

BoneFixator.com - Information and products for bone healing, deformity reduction, fracture fixation.
The website contains useful information on long bone anatomy, bone fracture, fracture types, bone healing and fixation methods and devices. Taylor Spatial Frame (TSF)  fixator is covered in great depth. Additionally challenges and solutions to reproducible x-ray taking are discussed.

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Bone Grafting

Cleveland Clinic Patient Information
Bone grafting refers to a wide variety of surgical methods augmenting or stimulating the formation of new bone where it is needed. There are four broad clinical situations in which bone grafting is performed:

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Debridement

Definition Debridement is the process of removing dead (necrotic) tissue or foreign material from and around a wound to expose healthy tissue. Purpose An open wound or ulcer can not be properly evaluated until the dead tissue or foreign matter is removed. Wounds that contain necrotic and ischemic (low oxygen content) tissue take longer to close and heal. This is because necrotic tissue provides an ideal growth medium for bacteria, especially for Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium perfringens that causes the gas gangrene so feared in military medical practice. Though a wound may not necessarily be infected, the bacteria can cause inflammation and strain the body's ability to fight infection. Debridement is also used to treat pockets of pus called abscesses. Abscesses can develop into a general infection that may invade the bloodstream (sepsis) and lead to amputation and even death. Burned tissue or tissue exposed to corrosive substances tends to form a hard black crust, called an eschar, while deeper tissue remains moist and white, yellow and soft, or flimsy and inflamed. Eschars may also require debridement to promote healing. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Emergency Surgery

Definition Emergency surgery is non-elective surgery performed when the patient's life or well-being is in direct jeopardy. Largely performed by surgeons specializing in emergency medicine, this surgery can be conducted for many reasons but occurs most often in urgent or critical cases in response to trauma, cardiac events, poison episodes, brain injuries, and pediatric medicine. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Finger Reattacment

Definition Finger reattachment (or replacement) is defined as reattachment of the part that has been completely amputated. Purpose Replantation refers to reattachment of a completely severed part, meaning there is no physical connection between the part that has been cut off and the person. Reattachment can be surgically performed for the finger and such other detached body parts, as the hand or arm. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Fracture Mal-Union

Cleveland Clinic Patient Information “Malunion” is a clinical term used to indicate that a fracture has healed, but that it has healed in less than an optimal position. This can happen in almost any bone after fracture and occurs for several reasons. Malunion may result in a bone being shorter than normal, twisted or rotated in a bad position, or bent. Many times all of these deformities are present in the same malunion.

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Fracture Non-Union

Clevelnad Clinic Patient Information Every fracture carries the risk of failing to heal and resulting in a nonunion. While nonunions can occur in any bone, they are most common in the tibia, humerus, talus, and fifth metatarsal bone. Several factors contribute to a non-union. If the bone ends that are fractured have been stripped away from the blood vessels that provide them with nutrition, they will die. As a result, the bone ends cannot contribute to new healing, and a nonunion is more likely. Without a good blood supply and growth of new blood vessels, no new bone will form and the fracture cannot readily heal.

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Fracture Patient Information AAOS

Search for Fracture in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Patient Information Site
350 pages as of Jan 2008

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Fracture Repair

Definition Fracture repair is the process of rejoining and realigning the ends of broken bones, usually performed by an orthopedist, general surgeon, or family doctor. In cases of an emergency, first aid measures should be used to provide temporary realignment and immobilization until proper medical help is available. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Fractures In General

By David Nelson MD Fractures (broken bones) are a fascinating subject. Maybe that's why I am an orthopedist! There has been a lot of research into fractures, so we know a lot about them. For instance, did you know that bones are the only tissue in the body that does not heal with scar? Skin heals with scar tissue, liver lacerations heal with scar, heart muscle heals with scar. Only bone heals with its original tissue, bone! Read on to find out more about your fracture. Remember, patient education is one of the most important things that I do, and it is the way you can best help yourself.

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Glossary of terms associated with leg fractures

Alphabetical partly illustrated list of Orthopaedic jargon terms employed by doctors to describe leg fractures, treatment and complications. Includes angulation, displacement, external fixation, intramedullary rod, healing of fractures, nonunion, Plate, pulmonary embolus, stiffness etc.

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Kneecap Removal

Definition Kneecap removal, or patellectomy, is the partial or total surgical removal of the patella, commonly called the kneecap. Purpose Kneecap removal is performed under three circumstances: The kneecap is fractured or shattered. The kneecap dislocates easily and repeatedly. Degenerative arthritis of the kneecap causes extreme pain. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Overview of Fractures

Patient information from the Cleveland Clinic

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Search for Patient Information on Fractures

Google Search using string allintitle: (fracture OR "Broken Bone") patient (guide OR education OR information)

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