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Bone And Joint Infections

Mayo Clinic Bone and Joint Infections Overview Your bones and joints, like nearly every part of your body, can fall prey to infection. Joint infections (septic or infectious arthritis) can damage cartilage and tissue within days. Bone infections, osteomyelitis (os-te-o-mi-uh-LI-tis), may fester for years and become debilitating if untreated. Bacteria, viruses, fungi and other germs are the culprits in these types of infections. They originate from an infection or injury elsewhere in your body. The germs from those sites are carried to your bones or joints through the bloodstream. Alternatively, the germs may enter a bone or joint directly from trauma or a nearby infection. For example, a sinus infection can spread directly into neighboring bones. Short-lived (acute) infections usually are treated and eliminated. When these infections don't go away with treatment, they can lead to a long-term (chronic) condition. Treatment can help control chronic infections, but the infections may reoccur or relapse. Approximately two to five of every 10,000 people experience one of these diseases. They can afflict any bone or joint at any age. In rare circumstances bone and joint infections can be fatal. However, early diagnosis and proper treatment especially with the use of appropriate antibiotics, which attack bacterial infections can help control or eliminate the infection. Continued with - Signs and symptoms Causes Risk factors When to seek medical advice Screening and diagnosis Complications Treatment Prevention Self-care

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Cellulitis

Overview Cellulitis (sel-u-LI-tis) is a potentially serious bacterial infection of your skin. Cellulitis appears as a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot and tender, and it may spread rapidly. Skin on the face or lower legs is most commonly affected by this infection, though cellulitis can occur on any part of your body. Cellulitis may be superficial affecting only the surface of your skin but cellulitis may also affect the tissues underlying your skin and can spread to your lymph nodes and bloodstream. Left untreated, the spreading bacterial infection may rapidly turn into a life-threatening condition. That's why it's important to recognize the signs and symptoms of cellulitis and to seek immediate medical attention if they occur. Following topics - Signs and symptoms Causes Risk factors When to seek medical advice Screening and diagnosis Complications Treatment Prevention

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Hospital Acquired Infections

Definition A hospital-acquired infection, also called a nosocomial infection, is an infection that first appears between 48 hours and four days after a patient is admitted to a hospital or other health-care facility. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Infections

Orthopaedic infections can be devastating. Disease-carrying bacteria, viruses and parasites that get into the body can destroy healthy tissue, multiply and spread through blood. Infection of skin and other soft tissue can lead to infection of bones (osteomyelitis) and joints (septic arthritis). Without prompt treatment, orthopaedic infections can become chronic. Thus, even a small scratch on the fingertip has the potential to permanently disable your hand, or worse. Fortunately, early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention when required can cure most infections and prevent permanent problems.

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National Necrotizing Fasciitis Foundation

Our Mission: To educate for public awareness, recognition of symptoms and preventative measures; to offer resources; and to offer support for those affected by necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh eating disease").

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Necrotizing Fasciitis

BC Health Files What is Necrotizing Fasciitis? Necrotizing fasciitis (neck-roe-tie-zing fa-shee-eye-tis) is more commonly known by the public as flesh-eating disease. The disease got this nickname as it can spread through human tissue (flesh), destroying it at a rate of almost three centimetres (1 inch) per hour. In some cases death can occur within 18 hours. When the bacteria spread along the layers of tissue that surround muscle (called the fascia), it is called necrotizing fasciitis.

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Necrotizing Fasciitis

Diving Medicine Articles Necrotizing Fasciitis A DAN Member's Brush With the Rare Flesh-Eating Disease Ends Well By Laurie Gowen, DAN Medical Information Specialist What's necrotizing fasciitis? The quick answer is that it's an insidious infection of the soft tissue that causes death of the infected area. It can ruin a perfectly good dive trip, or worse.

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Necrotizing Fasciitis Myositis

Necrotizing Fasciitis/Myositis ("flesh-eating disease") Public Health Agency of Canada Information Sheet The Issue Flesh-eating disease is rare. When it does occur, it is very serious and can lead to death. It is important to know the symptoms, and how to minimize your risks. Background Flesh-eating disease is the common name for necrotizing fasciitis (nek-roe-tie-zing fah-shee-eye-tis), an infection that works its way rapidly through the layers of tissue (the fascia) that surround muscles. It destroys tissue and can cause death within 12 to 24 hours. It is estimated that there are between 90 and 200 cases per year in Canada, and about 20 to 30 percent of these are fatal. The symptoms of flesh-eating disease include a high fever, and a red, severely painful swelling that feels hot and spreads rapidly. The skin may become purplish and then die. There may be extensive tissue destruction. Sometimes the swelling starts at the site of a minor injury, such as a small cut or bruise, but in other cases there is no obvious source of infection. (more)

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Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections

Necrotizing soft-tissue infection is a severe type of tissue infection that can involve the skin, subcutaneous fat, the muscle sheath (fascia), and the muscle. It can cause gangrene, tissue death, systemic disease, and death.

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What Is Necrotizing Fasciitis

Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a bacterial infection. This bacteria attacks the soft tissue and the fascia, which is a sheath of tissue covering the muscle. NF can occur in an extremity following a minor trauma, or after some other type of opportunity for the bacteria to enter the body such as surgery. The Group A Strep infection (flesh eating bacteria) is most common with minor trauma. A mixed bacterial infection is often the cause after surgery.

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