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Childrens Trauma (9)
Patient and parent information relating to injuries in children

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Syndactyly release

Syndactyly is the term for joined fingers (and toes)

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Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita

Web site of a support group for this joint condition

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Bow Legs and Knock Knees

All normal infants are born with bow-legs. By about 18-24 months of age, the knees are straight. This means that at the age when most children begin to walk, around 12 months, they appear bow-legged. By around 3 years of age, children become the most knock-kneed they will be. This can be dramatic. In fact, it can prompt a consultation with a physician even in patients who were seen by the physician at 1 year of age for bow-legs! After 3 years of age, children become less knock-kneed, ending up at the normal adult amount of slight knock-knee (5-9 degrees) that they will maintain throughout their life by approximately 7 years of age. The principal reason to know the normal development of knee angle is to avoid unnecessary interventions.

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Childrens Clubfoot - Treatment with Casting or Operation

Anatomy and Pathophysiology Natural History Surgical and Non-Surgical Options Non-Operative Treatment Benefits and Limits Surgical Intervention and Considerations Potential Operative Complications Rehabilitation/Convalescence Clubfoot is a complex deformity that is readily apparent at birth and in some cases is diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound. The goal of treatment is to obtain and maintain correction of the clubfoot so that the patient has a functional, pain-free, plantigrade foot, with good mobility and without calluses, and does not need modified shoes. Parents of infants born with clubfeet and no other significant medical problems should be reassured that their child, when treated by medical experts, will have feet that are fully compatible with a normal, active life. However, it must always be remembered that a clubfoot will never be a normal foot.

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Club Foot Repair

Definition Club foot repair, also known as foot tendon release or club foot release, is the surgical repair of a birth defect of the foot and ankle called club foot. Purpose Club foot or talipes equinovarus is the most common birth defect of the lower extremity, characterized by the foot turning both downward and inward. The defect can range from mild to severe and the purpose of club foot repair is to provide the child with a functional foot that looks as normal as possible and that is painless, plantigrade, and flexible. Plantigrade means that the child is able to stand with the sole of the foot on the ground, and not on his heels or the outside of his foot. Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers

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Clubfoot Talipes Equinovarus

Clubfoot [Talipes Equinovarus] Massachsetts General Hospital

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Definition of Scoliosis Terms SRS

Glossary of about 50 scoliosis related terms

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Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Pediatrics: Hip Dysplasia Definition Developmental dysplasia of the hip means bad formation of the joint that connects the body with the lower limb. The hip is a ball and socket joint. The ball is the head of the femur, or thigh-bone, and the socket is the acetabulum of the pelvis. There are two principal types of DDH: The hip may be unstable, or "dislocated": the ball is dislocated from, or falls out of, the socket. Alternatively, the hip may be stable, or "subluxated": there is no dislocation, but the socket grows too small or too shallow to adequately cover or contain the ball, which shifts around inside the socket but does not completely fall out.

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Ectodermal Dysplasia eMedicine

Review by dermatologist. Article by Kara N Shah, MD, PhD

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Ectodermal Dysplasia MedlinePlus

Definition Return to top Ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary condition characterized by abnormal development of the skin, hair, nails, teeth, and sweat glands.

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Ectodermal Dysplasia Society

Ectodermal Dysplasia (ED) is not a single disorder, but a group of closely related conditions. More than 150 different syndromes have been identified. The Ectodermal Dysplasias are heritable conditions in which there are abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the hair (tends to be very thin and sparse),teeth (absent, pointed or conical), nails, sweat glands (little or no sweating), cranial-facial structure, the eyes, digits and other parts of the body. Each combination of features represents another type of ED Syndrome and has a specific name.

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Ectodermal Dysplasia Wikipedia

Ectodermal dysplasia is not a single disorder, but a group of closely related conditions. More than 150 different syndromes have been identified. Ectodermal dysplasias are described as "heritable conditions in which there are abnormalities of two or more ectodermal structures such as the hair, teeth, nails, sweat glands, cranial-facial structure, digits and other parts of the body."

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Ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia cleft syndrome

Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft syndrome (EEC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the triad of ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and facial clefting (Celli, Duijf, Hamel, et al. 1999). Other features noted in association with EEC include vesicoureteral reflux, recurrent urinary tract infections (Ramirez, Lammer, 2004), obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct (Peterson-Falzone, Hardin-Jones, Karnell, 2001), decreased pigmentation of the hair and skin, missing or abnormal teeth, enamel hypoplasia, absent punctae in the lower eye lids, photophobia, occasional cognitive impairment and kidney anomalies, (Shprintzen, 1997) and conductive hearing loss (Brunner, Hamel, van Bokhoven, 2002; Shprintzen, 1997). Ectrodactyly involves the deficiency or absence of one or more central digits of the hand or foot and is also known as split hand-split foot malformation (SHFM), (Moerman and Fryns, 1996; Brunner et al., 2002). The hands and feet of people with ectrodactyly are often described as "claw-like" and may include only the thumb and one finger (usually either the little finger, ring finger, or a syndactyly of the two) with similar abnormalities of the feet (Peterson-Falzone, et al., 2001).

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